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Post Properties has been providing luxury apartments in the most desirable neighborhoods since 1971. Learn more about us and our culture through our blog.


The Best Treehouse Living in the States

Just For Fun
03/07/2016
 

Treehouse living got a lot of press this year. The main reason is a young man named Foster Huntington. Huntington was featured in the New York Times Style section, for leaving a job as a designer with Ralph Lauren to move to a treehouse, 35 feet off the ground, on a grassy hilltop in southwest Washington state. He called his treehouse The Cinder Cone.

In addition to the NYT, Huntington has been featured in Outside magazine, the Huffington Post, VICE, Popular Mechanics, and now (kind of), the Post Properties blog. But our obsession with treehouses did not begin with Huntington. According MotherEarthNews.com, treehouses have long been used by people of the South Pacific and Southeast Asia, and, all the way back in the 1700s, the English navigator Captain James Cook recorded an encounter with treetop dwellers in Tasmania.

But aside from treehouses on the other side of the world, and the simple treehouses of our youth, livable treehouses or adult treehouses, started becoming popular in the United States in the 90s. Treehouse enthusiasts praise the minimalism, simplicity, and peace that comes with living in nature high above the ground. When vacation rental website AirBnB became a thing in 2009, treehouses were made easily available for the un-Foster Huntingtons among us, those not ready to quit their gig and live among the treetops. Now you can take a few days, live like Tarzan and Jane, and then return to your life as usual.

We looked around the Internet and put together a list of some of the coolest, most B.A., treetop homes in America. Who knows, if y’all are really into it, maybe we’ll start construction on the first treehouse apartment community.

The Cinder Cone, Washougal, Washington.

Designed and built by Foster Huntington and a few collaborators, The Cinder Cone consists of two treehouses connected by bridges: the Studio, a red cedar cabin positioned among three trees 20 feet above the ground, and the Octagon, an appropriately named treehouse 35 feet above the ground.


  • Photo courtesy of TheCinderCone.com

  • Photo courtesy of TheCinderCone.com

  • Photo courtesy of TheCinderCone.com

  • Photo courtesy of TheCinderCone.com

  • Photo courtesy of TheCinderCone.com

  • Photo courtesy of TheCinderCone.com


Buckhead Treehouses, Atlanta, Georgia
This urban oasis is located only minutes from downtown Atlanta. It’s actually a collection of three treehouses connected by ship-rope bridges. Each treehouse, or room, sleeps two. The treehouses, which rent on AirBnB, were named the company’s #1 Most Desirable Listing Worldwide in January 2016, by Business Insider.
  • Photo courtesy of AirBnB

  • Photo courtesy of AirBnB

  • Photo courtesy of AirBnB

  • Photo courtesy of AirBnB

  • Photo courtesy of AirBnB

  • Photo courtesy of AirBnB

  • Photo courtesy of AirBnB

Edisto River Treehouses, Canadys, South Carolina
For travelers looking for a rustic, off-the-grid vacation, these 10 remote treehouses are perfect. There’s no electricity and no running water, and the treehouses are only accessible by canoe (more than 10 miles each way!).

  • Photo courtesy of Carolina Heritage Outfitters

  • Photo courtesy of Carolina Heritage Outfitters

  • Photo courtesy of Carolina Heritage Outfitters

  • Photo courtesy of Carolina Heritage Outfitters

  • Photo courtesy of Carolina Heritage Outfitters

Tropical Treehouse, Rincon, Puerto Rico
This treehouse is actually what’s called a hooch, a structure with a minimal foundation that maintains its balance by a web of cables attached to the surrounding trees. Renters have three options, each with fully functional kitchenettes, with sinks, solar hot water, and two burner propane counter top stoves. The penthouse suite of the Sunset Hooch has beautiful views of the Caribbean sea.

  • Photo courtesy of Tropical Treehouse

  • Photo courtesy of Tropical Treehouse

  • Photo courtesy of Tropical Treehouse

  • Photo courtesy of Tropical Treehouse

  • Photo courtesy of Tropical Treehouse

Ahh! It looks like a nice life. But say you’re on the hunt for something a little more...I don’t know, luxurious? air conditioned? closer to work? closer to your kid’s school? closer to bars and restaurants? I think we might be able to help. Take a look at Post communities in some of your favorite cities across the southeast. That way you can reserve treehouse living for vacation time.